Environment 2000

Women’s Indigenous knowledge and Biodiversity Conservation

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Summary 

Vandana Shiva writes that women are there reason there is biodiversity in this world. In the text, she talks about the important yet invisible role of women in agriculture, raising farm animals, the dairy industry, forestry and much more. Their work is invisible because of the gender bias in society. She says women in India have so much knowledge on the growth of different seeds. They know everything from the way they need to be grown, to the cooking of that seed. It is known by women that crop uniformity is not good, because there is no diversity in the plants, which is essential for the soil and for the plants to grow healthy. It is also mentioned that women conserve diversity. Third world country women are the root of their county’s health and well being. At the end of the text, the author talks about how so many toxicants are put into the growing of GMO’s, and it is not good for the diversity of plants, or the health of the animals and humans eating them.

 

Question : What is an “ecofeminist”?

Based on the text “Women’s Indigenous knowledge and Biodiversity Conservation”, an ecofeminist is a person”… who sees the important connections between the domination of women and the domination of nature under the patriarchal social and political framework that characterizes most of the world’s human cultures.” They are different from environmentalist because their principles are not the same. An ecofeminist has two main principles, according to Vandana Shiva. The first one being, they do not agree with women having an intrinsic feminine perspective on the relationship between humans and nature. The second one, being in a patriarchal society made them have a different way of thinking about environmental issues.

 

Resources :
VANDANA SHIVA, from “Women’s Indigenous Knowledge and Biodiversity Conservation,” in Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva, Ecofeminism (Zed Books, 1993); T. A. Easton (Ed.), Classic Edition Sources: Environmental studies (4th ed., pp. 200-203). New York, NY: Mc Graw Hill
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